Friday, 3 May 2013

Landfill Childrens Orchestra Makes Music From Trash

Too Many Children In The World Are Born Into Lives With Little Or No Hope.

Landfill Harmonic reveals a mind-boggling, inventive effort to change that - musical instruments made from trash. In the barrios of Paraguay, a humble garbage picker uses his ingenuity to craft instruments out of recycled materials - and a youth orchestra is born. Music arises and children find new dreams.

A film about “The Recycled Orchestra”, a group of children from a Paraguayan slum who play instruments made entirely of garbage. It is a beautiful story about the transformative power of music, which also highlights two vital issues of our times: poverty and waste pollution.

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A few years ago, one of the garbage pickers, Cola, an untutored genius of the slum, got together with local musician Favio Chavez to make instruments for the children of the slum. There was no money for real instruments so together they started to make instruments from trash - violins and cellos from oil drums, flutes from water pipes and spoons, guitars from packing crates.

"A violin is worth more than a recycler's house," says Chávez. "We couldn't give a child a formal instrument as it would have put him in a difficult position. The family may have looked to sell or trade it.

With children like Ada and Tania and with the support of many in the slum, Favio slowly put together one of the world’s most unlikely orchestras. It is entirely made of garbage. They call it “The Recycled Orchestra”.

Most of the kids in the orchestra are from Cateura or close by areas. Cateura is a village essentially built on top of a landfill. Garbage collectors browse the trash for sellable goods, where children are often at risk of getting involved with drugs and gangs. The orchestra has offered these kids and teenagers a new alternative to the life their parents had. The film follows the story of several kids and their families.

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